Search

Georgia Northwestern's Bobcat Blog

Get Focused. Get Hired.

GNTC Construction Management Students Lend a Hand to Habitat for Humanity

About a dozen construction students from GNTC working at a Habitat For Humanity house.
Students in GNTC’s Construction Management program helped restore a Habit for Humanity house in Calhoun during the spring semester. Some of the work students did included framing a room, running electrical, hanging drywall, roofing, and replacing a front porch.

 

Students in Georgia Northwestern Technical College’s (GNTC) Construction Management program volunteered their time and services to help restore a house for Habitat of Humanity in Gordon County this past semester.

 

According to Donny Holmes, director of GNTC’s Construction Management program, the project was part of a long relationship that is mutually beneficial to Habitat for Humanity, GNTC, and the Gordon County area.

 

“They contacted us at least 10 years ago and asked if we could help put some vinyl siding on a house,” said Holmes. “After that, here and there, they would contact us to fill in when volunteers from the community were not available.”

 

Some of the work students did for this project included framing a room, running electrical, hanging drywall, roofing, and replacing a front porch.

 

“It’s a great learning environment for the students plus they get to help out in the community,” said Holmes. “After the job was over a lot of the students said they enjoyed it and I think being able to use their skills to help out in the community gave them a sense of pride.”

 

Among the students was Chandler Biagini, a Construction Management student from Dallas. Biagini said that he received a lot of hands-on experience with the project, but the best part was knowing that he helped someone in the community.

 

“I feel like when I help someone out, I get it back ten-fold down the road,” said Biagini. “It is awesome anytime you can help someone.”

 

Georgia Northwestern Technical College provides quality workforce education to the citizens of Northwest Georgia. Students have the opportunity to earn an associate degree, diploma, or a certificate in business, health, industrial, or public service career paths. This past year, 16,402 people benefited from GNTC’s credit and noncredit programs. With an annual credit enrollment of 7,750 students, GNTC is the largest college in Northwest Georgia. GNTC has an additional enrollment of 8,652 people through adult education, continuing education, business and industry training, and Georgia Quick Start.  For more information about GNTC, visit us at www.GNTC.edu. The Student Help Center is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at 844-348-7659 or via online chat at https://helpcenter.gntc.edu. GNTC is a unit of the Technical College System of Georgia and an Equal Opportunity Institution.

WALKER LAUNCH and GNTC

Walker County Schools and GNTC are providing students from LaFayette and Ridgeland High Schools the opportunity to earn dual enrollment college credit with Walker Launch at GNTC!

GNTC and Grant Writing USA to Offer a Two-Day Grant Writing Workshop on the Floyd County Campus

Georgia Northwestern Technical College (GNTC) and Grant Writing USA will present a two-day grant writing workshop on the Floyd County Campus in Rome, July 26-27.

 

The workshop will take place in Room 101 B of the H Building. Classes will begin at 9 a.m. and will end at 4 p.m. on both days. Tuition for the workshop is $455 per person and includes workbook, access to alumni forums, and over 200 sample grant proposals.

 

The training will help beginning and experienced grant writers from city, county, and state agencies as well as K-12 schools, colleges, and universities.

Continuing Education Unit (CEU) credits are available to educators that participate in the workshop. The workshop is endorsed by the Grant Professionals Association (GPA).

 

For more information or to register online, visit the web site http://grantwritingusa.com/grants-training/grant-writing-workshops/rome-georgia-july-2018.html or contact Samantha Bishop, academic affairs credentialing and grants assistant at GNTC, via email at sbishop@gntc.edu or at 706.295.6849.

 

Georgia Northwestern Technical College provides quality workforce education to the citizens of Northwest Georgia. Students have the opportunity to earn an associate degree, diploma, or a certificate in business, health, industrial, or public service career paths. This past year, 16,402 people benefited from GNTC’s credit and noncredit programs. With an annual credit enrollment of 7,750 students, GNTC is the largest college in Northwest Georgia. GNTC has an additional enrollment of 8,652 people through adult education, continuing education, business and industry training, and Georgia Quick Start.  For more information about GNTC, visit us at www.GNTC.edu. The Student Help Center is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at 844-348-7659 or via online chat at https://helpcenter.gntc.edu. GNTC is a unit of the Technical College System of Georgia and an Equal Opportunity Institution.

Get Dropped? Student Help Center Is Here

Summer Semester begins Monday!
Your Student Help Center can help you every step of the way. Visit one on any campus or call them 24 hours a day / seven days a week at 844-348-7659.
#getfocusedgethired

What’s Left is What’s Right: Trucking With Dyslexia

Teaching To The Student at GNTC

 

Ashley Petty sits in the cab of a GNTC tractor-trailer while her instructor stands on the ground alongside the open door to the cab.
“Gordon County, Georgia’s Ashley Petty poses from the cab of a Georgia Northwestern Technical College Commercial Truck Driving program tractor-trailer. Standing in the foreground on a hot day at the college’s truck driving facility is Georgia Northwestern Technical College Program Director Robert Browder.”

 

(Northwest Georgia) – Not knowing which way to turn in life is a very common feeling among most adults. Whether it is figuring out how to pay the bills or how to handle raising a child, 32-year-old Ashley Petty knows those struggles all too well.

But for Petty, not knowing which way to turn in life is more than just an expression. It’s a trial that has led to a triumph in earning her Commercial Truck Driving certification at Georgia Northwestern Technical College.

You see, Petty suffers from dyslexia. The disorder makes learning to read, write, interpret symbols, etc… much more difficult than it is for your average college student. It doesn’t affect a person’s intelligence, but it makes cracking the code of everyday life a puzzle all on its own.

“I have what is called directional dyslexia,” said Petty in an interview at the Georgia Northwestern Technical College Commercial Truck Driving facility in Walker County, Georgia. “I had a tough time being able to figure out directions in transportation. If an instructor told me to turn the wheel to the right or left, I really had a problem. I had to find a new way to learn.”

For anyone who has ever attempted to “back-up” a trailer of any size as it is hitched to a pulling vehicle, they know it is a difficult task. Now, Petty was previously a bus driver for a Georgia school system before coming to GNTC. “However, that’s a different thing altogether when you back-up a bus. It isn’t split in the middle,” said Georgia Northwestern Technical College Commercial Truck Driving Program Director Robert Browder. “Manipulating the tractor and the trailer at the same time requires concentration and precision. With Ashley’s dyslexia, she saw this as a major problem to overcome. But, we just realized it meant we simply needed to teach her a little differently.”

Commercial Truck Driving instructions will have drivers make left or right-hand turns, as well as have to back up their trailers in one direction or the other. “I spoke with our Disabilities Services specialists at the college and they helped us think of some great learning techniques,” said Browder. “When we want her to turn the wheel to the right, she immediately knows to turn towards the hand with the ring on it. She now wears a ring on her right hand to remind her. Now, her ring hand is her right hand. She turns towards the ring.”

There are other little short cuts that Petty has learned along the way thanks to her college instructor and her classmates. “I’ve battled dyslexia all my life,” said Petty. “Now, my 10-year-old, Sidney, also lives with it and battles it herself in her classroom, too. However, partly as a result of how I’ve had to learn the hard way, she is now really starting to perform well in school. We simply wouldn’t let her take the easy way out. A good school and patient teachers have made that adjustment an easier one for Sidney at her school and me at mine.”

Before settling down in Gordon County, Georgia, Petty and her daughter lived in Murphy, North Carolina. She says one of her daughter’s teachers in North Carolina really made the struggle hit home for her. “She had a teacher that told us that if she can’t learn it the way she’s teaching it, she’d never learn it,” said Petty. “I told her how that’s not true. Sometimes, you have to teach something a little differently for particular students. Not all students learn in the same way.”

“What we found was that Gordon County has plenty of teachers who have been learning to work with children with all kinds of learning disabilities,” said Petty. “As a result, she is now right at her grade level in areas she had previously been struggling with before coming to the new school.”

As a student of Tolbert Elementary, her daughter is getting care and instruction she personally never got to enjoy when she was young. With more than 700 students at Tolbert Elementary, it is nearly five times the size of her last school in North Carolina. “The school may be larger, but the teachers at Tolbert have really taken the time with Sidney to help her learn how to succeed academically.”

Now, Commercial Truck Driver-to-be Ashely Petty may have received similar care and instruction at Georgia Northwestern, however, when she was a child, life experience alone taught her quickly she would learn in her own way. Originally from Cobb County, Georgia, her biological parents separated when she was only four years old. Her mother would die four years later. She then bounced from group home to group home before ever having a chance of being adopted. From being a troubled teen and being relocated to state youth facilities to going through the adoption process at 13-years-old, Petty learned early that things were simply different for her. She learned that things would never come easy.

“My adopted mother noticed I had signs of dyslexia in high school,” said Petty. “I could figure out the answer to questions. However, I couldn’t prove it on paper. I was inverting numbers whenever I did math problems.”

A 2007 graduate of Fannin County High School in Blue Ridge, Georgia, Petty wasn’t sure what kind of career her future would hold. After graduation, she worked several different jobs, never really gaining any traction in any of them. So, after more than a decade of dealing with foster families, her troubled teen years, and a struggle just to survive high school and now life, she knew she didn’t want the same thing for her daughter.

“Now, while in college, I made myself work harder,” said Petty. “My boyfriend is a diesel mechanic. There were times where when he was working a commercial truck yard, I would come to visit and I would get the chance to get into the cab of a tractor-trailer. With me driving a stick-shift car, working a manual transmission in a tractor-trailer felt pretty natural to me.” Once she took her first drive around the truck yard, Petty was hooked.

Today, just one class away from having a two-year Associate’s Degree, Petty is looking to a brighter future for her and her little family. But, it’s a future that has roots in the past. It turns out after meeting her biological family over the past few years, she learned her biological grandfather was a truck driver. As well, several other members of her family had long-hauls down the highways on a regular basis, themselves.

Now in 2018, Petty is looking for close-to-home options for a commercial truck driving opportunity which will allow her to hit the open road. “I’ve spoken with some local companies just recently and hope to hear from them, soon,” said Petty. “But, I really need to be close to home for my girl. I’m proud of the opportunities I’m now facing, but I want to be able to help my daughter get a jump start on life that was almost impossible for me to have when I was young.”

GNTC offers more than 200 other programs online and on-campus. Campuses are located in Ringgold (Catoosa County Campus), Rome (Floyd County Campus), Calhoun (Gordon County Campus), Rockmart (Polk County Campus), Rock Spring (Walker County Campus), and Dalton (Whitfield Murray Campus).
Georgia Northwestern Technical College provides quality workforce education to the citizens of Northwest Georgia. Students have the opportunity to earn an associate degree, diploma, or a certificate in business, health, industrial, or public service career paths. This past year, 16,402 people benefited from GNTC’s credit and noncredit programs. With an annual credit enrollment of 7,750 students, GNTC is the largest college in Northwest Georgia. GNTC has an additional enrollment of 8,652 people through adult education, continuing education, business and industry training, and Georgia Quick Start.  For more information about GNTC, visit us at www.GNTC.edu. The Student Help Center is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at 844-348-7659 or via online chat at https://helpcenter.gntc.edu. GNTC is a unit of the Technical College System of Georgia and an Equal Opportunity Institution.

Manufacturing Job Fair held at GNTC’s Floyd County Campus

Several dozen young to middle-aged adults, dressed casually to business casual, are seen in a large conference room on the Floyd County Campus of GNTC.
A Job Fair was held at GNTC’s Floyd County Campus to showcase area employment opportunities in the manufacturing industry.

 

A Job Fair was held at Georgia Northwestern Technical College’s (GNTC) Floyd County Campus in Rome on Tuesday, May 15, to showcase area employment opportunities in the manufacturing industry.

 

The job fair was sponsored by the Greater Rome Existing Industries Association (GREIA), the manufacturing sector of the Rome Floyd Chamber. A 10 a.m. job fair was held for students and a 2 p.m. job fair was held for the public.

 

GNTC staff were also on hand to provide information about admissions, programs of study, and academic support.

 

“It’s a good opportunity for graduating students to find a career as well as those who are unemployed or underemployed,” said Ken Wright, director of Business and Industry Services at the Rome Floyd Chamber.

 

There were representatives and vendors from 2Work Staffing, F&P Georgia, Georgia Pacific, Georgia Highlands College, GNTC, Foss Manufacturing, Kelly Services, Jibe Staffing, Lowes, Mohawk Industries, Neaton of Rome, Randstad, Steel King, Suhner, Syntech, Tyson, Marglen Industries, Pirelli, and Profile Custom Extrusions.

 

Georgia Northwestern Technical College provides quality workforce education to the citizens of Northwest Georgia. Students have the opportunity to earn an associate degree, diploma, or a certificate in business, health, industrial, or public service career paths. This past year, 16,402 people benefited from GNTC’s credit and noncredit programs. With an annual credit enrollment of 7,750 students, GNTC is the largest college in Northwest Georgia. GNTC has an additional enrollment of 8,652 people through adult education, continuing education, business and industry training, and Georgia Quick Start.  For more information about GNTC, visit us at www.GNTC.edu. The Student Help Center is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, at 844-348-7659 or via online chat at https://helpcenter.gntc.edu. GNTC is a unit of the Technical College System of Georgia and an Equal Opportunity Institution.

Fees and Tuition Due TODAY

Going to college this summer? Make sure your dues are paid TODAY!
Today is the deadline for tuition and fees to be paid.
Check your account today at GNTC.edu!
wcc-welcome-week-2014-6

Summer Semester Payment Deadline

TOMORROW is the PAYMENT DEADLINE for Summer Semester 2018! Be sure to check your account to make sure you’re ready to begin classes next week!

SummerPaymentDeadline2018

Notice To Nursing Students, Candidates, Recruits

Notice to students: Associate of Science Nursing will begin following the GNTC academic policy for the five-year time limit on College Algebra (Math 1111).
This requirement for acceptance into the program will go into effect for the students accepted into the Fall 2020 class.
If you have questions, contact Ms. Carson in the nursing department at 706-764-3851 or dcarson@gntc.edu.

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑